Ex Army Chiefs (COAS) Of Pakistan

by Pakistan Armed Forces

Pakistan has had several army chiefs since its independence in 1947. Here is a list of some of the notable army chiefs of Pakistan:

  1. General Sir Frank Walter Messervy (1947-1948)
  2. General Douglas David Gracey D (1948-1951)
  3. Field Marshal Ayub Khan (1951-1958)
  4. General Muhammad Musa (1958-1966)
  5. General Yahya Khan (1966-1971)
  6. General Tikka Khan (1971-1972)
  7. General Gul Hassan Khan (1972-1976)
  8. General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq (1976-1988)
  9. General Aslam Beg (1988-1991)
  10. General Asif Nawaz Janjua (1991-1993)
  11. General Waheed Kakar (1993-1996)
  12. General Jehangir Karamat (1996-1998)
  13. General Pervez Musharraf (1998-2007)
  14. General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani (2007-2013)
  15. General Raheel Sharif (2013-2016)
  16. General Qamar Javed Bajwa (2016-2022)
  17. General Asim Muneer Bajwa (2022-Present)

Ex Army Chiefs (COAS) Of Pakistan

General Sir Frank Walter Messervy (1947-1948)

General Sir Frank Walter Messervy was the first commander-in-chief of the Pakistani army, serving in this role from 1947 to 1948. He was a British officer who was appointed to this position shortly after Pakistan gained independence in 1947. He played a key role in organizing and training the newly formed Pakistani military.

Before serving as the commander-in-chief of the Pakistani army, Messervy served as a commander in the British Indian Army during World War II. He led the 7th Indian Division in the Burma campaign and was later appointed as the commander of the Indian XV Corps. After the war, he played a key role in the transfer of power from British rule to India and Pakistan.

Messervy served as the Pakistani army’s commander-in-chief for just over a year before retiring from military service in 1948. He passed away in 1972 at the age of 81.

General Douglas David Gracey D (1948-1951)

General Douglas David Gracey was the second commander-in-chief of the Pakistani army, serving in this role from 1948 to 1951. Like his predecessor, General Sir Frank Walter Messervy, Gracey was a British officer who was appointed to this position shortly after Pakistan gained independence in 1947.

Before serving as the commander-in-chief of the Pakistani army, Gracey served as a commander in the British Indian Army during World War II. He led the 17th Indian Division in the Burma campaign and was later appointed as the commander of the Eastern Army in India.

As the Pakistani army’s commander-in-chief, Gracey played a key role in organizing and training the newly formed military. He also played a role in the establishment of the Pakistan Military Academy at Kakul, which was established to train and educate future military leaders.

Gracey served as the Pakistani army’s commander-in-chief until 1951, when he retired from military service. He passed away in 1993 at the age of 94.

Field Marshal Ayub Khan (1951-1958)

Field Marshal Ayub Khan was the first military ruler of Pakistan and served as the country’s president from 1958 to 1969. He seized power in a military coup in 1958 and ruled as a dictator until his resignation in 1969.

Before serving as president, Ayub Khan served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan, a position he held from 1951 to 1958. As Chief of Army Staff, he played a key role in modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military. During his tenure as president, Ayub Khan implemented a number of economic and social reforms, including the establishment of a national education system and the expansion of infrastructure. He is also credited with improving relations with other countries, particularly the United States.

However, Ayub Khan is also criticized for suppressing political opposition and for his handling of the 1965 war with India. He resigned as president in 1969 and died in 1974 at the age of 76.

General Muhammad Musa (1958-1966)

General Muhammad Musa was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1958 to 1966. He served as the head of the Pakistani military during a period of significant political and military tensions in the region, including the Indo-Pakistan War of 1965.

Before serving as Chief of Army Staff, Musa served in various military and political positions, including as commander of the Pakistan Military Academy and as the governor of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh).

As Chief of Army Staff, Musa played a key role in modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military. During his tenure as Chief of Army Staff, Musa faced significant challenges, including the ongoing conflict in Kashmir and the Indo-Pakistan War of 1965. He retired from military service in 1966 and passed away in 1998 at the age of 95.

General Yahya Khan (1966-1971)

General Yahya Khan was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1966 to 1971 and served as the President of Pakistan from 1969 to 1971. He seized power in a military coup in 1969 and ruled as a dictator until his resignation in 1971.

Before serving as Chief of Army Staff, Yahya Khan served in various military and political positions, including as commander of the Pakistan Military Academy and as the governor of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh).

During his tenure as President, Yahya Khan faced significant challenges, including political unrest and the ongoing conflict in Kashmir. He is also criticized for his handling of the 1971 civil war in East Pakistan, which led to the creation of Bangladesh. He resigned as President in 1971 and died in 1980 at the age of 66.

General Tikka Khan (1971-1972)

Tikka Khan served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1971 to 1972. He is known for his role in the 1971 civil war in East Pakistan, which led to the creation of Bangladesh. He is also criticized for his role in the military crackdown against Bengali separatists, which is believed to have resulted in the deaths of thousands of civilians. He retired from military service in 1972 and passed away in 2002 at the age of 84.

General Gul Hassan Khan (1972-1976)

Gul Hassan Khan served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1972 to 1976. He is known for his role in the modernization and restructuring of the Pakistani military. He also played a key role in improving relations with neighboring countries, including India and Afghanistan. He retired from military service in 1976 and passed away in 2008 at the age of 91.

General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq (1976-1988)

General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1976 to 1988 and served as the President of Pakistan from 1978 to 1988. He took power in a military coup in 1977 and ruled as a dictator until his death in 1988. Before serving as Chief of Army Staff, Zia-ul-Haq served in various military and political positions, the governor of Punjab province.

During his tenure as President, Zia-ul-Haq implemented a number of policies that promoted Islamic fundamentalism, including the introduction of sharia law and the Islamization of the education system. He is also criticized for his authoritarian rule and for suppressing political opposition. He died in a plane crash in 1988.

General Aslam Beg (1988-1991)

General Aslam Beg served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1988 to 1991. He is known for his role in modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military. He also played a key role in improving relations with the United States and other countries.

As Chief of Army Staff, Aslam Beg implemented a number of reforms aimed at modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military. He also played a key role in improving relations with the United States and other countries. Aslam Beg retired from military service in 1991 and passed away in 2017 at the age of 92.

General Asif Nawaz Janjua (1991-1993)

General Asif Nawaz Janjua served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1991 to 1993. He was born in 1942 in the village of Kot Addu in Punjab, Pakistan. He received his early education in his hometown and later joined the Pakistan Military Academy in 1962.

After completing his training at the Military Academy, Janjua was commissioned as an officer in the Pakistani army. He served in various military and political positions over the course of his career, including as commander of the Pakistan Military Academy and as the governor of Punjab province.

As Chief of Army Staff, Janjua implemented a number of reforms aimed at modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military. He also played a key role in improving relations with neighboring countries, including India and Afghanistan.

In addition to his military career, Janjua was also involved in politics and was a member of the Pakistan Muslim League (Nawaz), a political party led by Nawaz Sharif. He retired from military service in 1993 and passed away later that year at the age of 51.

Janjua is remembered as a strong and decisive leader who played a key role in modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military.

General Waheed Kakar (1993-1996)

General Waheed Kakar served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1993 to 1996. Waheed Kakar retired from military service in 1996 and passed away in 2013 at the age of 70.

General Jehangir Karamat (1996-1998)

General Jehangir Karamat served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1996 to 1998. Jehangir Karamat retired from military service in 1998 and passed away in 2021 at the age of 81. General Jehangir Karamat was a Pakistani military officer who served as the Chief of Army Staff from 1996 to 1998. He was born in 1940 in Quetta, Pakistan and received his early education in his hometown. He later joined the Pakistan Military Academy and was commissioned as an officer in the Pakistani army in 1960.

General Pervez Musharraf (1998-2007)

General Pervez Musharraf was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 1998 to 2007 and served as the President of Pakistan from 1999 to 2008. He seized power in a military coup in 1999 and ruled as a dictator until his resignation in 2008.

In 1999, Musharraf seized power in a military coup and became the President of Pakistan. During his tenure as President, he implemented a number of economic and social reforms, including the establishment of a national education system and the expansion of infrastructure. He is credited with improving Pakistan’s relations with the United States, but he is also criticized for his authoritarian rule and for his handling of the conflict in Kargil. He was forced to resign in 2008 and currently lives in self-imposed exile.

General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani (2007-2013)

General Ashfaq Parvez Kayani was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 2007 to 2013. He was born in 1952 in Lahore, Pakistan and received his early education in his hometown. He later joined the Pakistan Military Academy and was commissioned as an officer in the Pakistani army in 1974.

General Raheel Sharif (2013-2016)

General Raheel Sharif served as the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 2013 to 2016. He is known for his role in modernizing and strengthening the Pakistani military.

General Raheel Sharif was the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 2013 to 2016. He was born in 1956 in Quetta, Pakistan and received his early education in his hometown. He later joined the Pakistan Military Academy and was commissioned as an officer in the Pakistani army in 1976.

Sharif retired from military service in 2016 and currently serves as the head of the Islamic Military Counter Terrorism Coalition, an organization that aims to counter terrorism and promote cooperation among Muslim-majority countries.

General Qamar Javed Bajwa (2016-2022)

General Qamar Javed Bajwa is the Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan from 2016 to 2022. Bajwa is the current Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan, having taken office in 2016. He has focused on modernizing the military and improving relations with neighboring countries. He has also played a key role in the fight against terrorism in Pakistan.

General Qamar Javed Bajwa is the current Chief of Army Staff of Pakistan, having taken up this position in November 2016. He was born in 1960 in the city of Ghakar Mandi in Punjab, Pakistan and received his early education in his hometown. He later joined the Pakistan Military Academy and was commissioned as an officer in the Pakistani army in 1980.

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